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See Native: You Can Always Take a Different Road

You’re probably familiar with Robert Frost’s poem The Road Not Taken, which ends with the famous lines:

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”

But, did you know it’s one of America’s most misread poems?

In the beginning, when describing the two roads, the poet says, “both that morning equally lay.”  One road wasn’t “less traveled” than the other; they looked the same.   

After choosing a road, the poet exclaims, “Oh, I kept the other for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back.” This reminds us that we often don’t consider taking more than one road. Or, worse, when we face two roads, we freeze and don’t take either.  Once we choose a road in life, we tend to think we have to stick to it forever, so we either freeze under pressure, or we choose one road, get used to it, and don’t take the time to go back and try another.  

In the end, the poet thinks about one day telling the story and probably saying, “I took the [road] less traveled by, and that has made all of the difference,” even though the roads really looked the same. 

The famous closing lines of The Road Not Taken are often misread and don’t mean that the more challenging roads in life are the better roads. They remind us that when we choose between two roads, one road isn’t always better than the other; they’re probably just different. When we reflect on our choices, we often change the truth in order to justify the consequences, when we don’t need to. If we’re not happy with a road we choose, then we can go back and choose another. We can take the roads not taken. 

Here’s the entire poem, if you’d like to check it out. 

If you don’t like the road you’re on,

you can always take another. 

#GoNativeSeeNative @ NativeSlope.com

We like and sell sunglasses. We also write about them. Check out more of our posts HERE.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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See Native: Brighten Your Day & Someone Else’s

Happiness is contagious, so spread some love today by focusing not only on others but also on yourself.

When you’re feeling good, others around you will too. We often spend too much time trying to make others happy, and we end up draining our own happiness.  That, in the end, doesn’t make anyone really happy at all.

Don’t confuse this with selfishness; if you’re reading this post, then you’re likely the kind of person who gets joy by giving joy.

Do what makes you joyful today.

Brighten someone else’s day by brightening your own.

#GoNativeSeeNative @ NativeSlope.com

We like and sell sunglasses. We also write about them. Check out more of our posts HERE.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Sunglasses 101: Grilamid TR® Sunglasses

Many performance sunglasses boast Grilamid TR® frames, which sounds like something from a superhero action movie, but what is Grilamid TR®? Is it as hardcore-awesome as it sounds?  Grilamid TR® is a badass material that is definitely hardcore-awesome, and that’s why it’s used in many military, medical, and other high-performance applications.

Grilamid TR® Defined for the Layman

Grilamid TR®  is a transparent amorphous thermoplastic, which means it’s a plastic material, or polymer, that gets soft when heated to extreme temperatures and solid when cooled, and it does this without discoloring or losing its strength. Manufacturers can easily shape it into objects that must maintain their integrity in physically-stressful, highly-active situations.

Not a layman or just want to geek out to more Grilamid TR® facts? CLICK HERE to check out EMS-GRIVORY’s  36-page Grilamid TR® info booklet. EMS-GRIVORY manufactures the stuff under the Grilamid TR® brand name, so they know what they’re talking about.

The Benefits of Grilamid®

Here’s why Grilamid TR® is particularly perfect for sunglasses:

  • It’s super lightweight
  • It’s flexible, impact-resistant, and extremely durable
  • It’s highly transparent and easy to color
  • It has low flammability and is resistant to many sunglass-harming chemicals
  • It stands up against high and low temperatures
  • It’s UV ray resistant

 
Not all sunglasses are created equal, and only some of the toughest, made-for-action shades have Grilamid TR® frames.  A few of our favorite brands that often feature Grilamid TR® frames include HovenUnder Armour, and Costa Del Mar.

Want to learn more about sunglasses, like what makes polarized sunglasses polarized and why an ANSI rating is important? Check out our other Sunglasses 101 posts!


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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Sunglasses 101: ANSI Rated Sunglasses

You’ve probably seen sunglasses that have an ANSI rating or a sticker that says they’re “ANSI compliant,” like these Under Armour sunglasses:

ANSI compliant sunglasses
Under Armour is one of many sunglass manufacturers that make ANSI compliant shades.

 

So, what does an ANSI rating mean, and why should you care about it when you’re selecting sunglasses?

For people who like to work hard and play hard, an ANSI rating is important, especially when hazardous materials and/or flying objects are involved.  When it comes to sunglassesANSI compliant means BADASS.

The acronym ANSI stands for the American National Standards Institute, which is a non-profit organization that serves as the United State’s official standards rating institution. ANSI has been around for over 90 years and has over 1000 members that work together to develop voluntary national consensus standards. These members include trade associations, government agencies, professional societies, labor interest groups, and more. ANSI strives to include “. . .representation from almost every U.S. industry sector.” 

When it comes to eyewear, the Z87.1 standard refers to the “American National Standard for Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices,” which includes minimum safety guidelines for non-prescription eye protection against different types of impact, radiation, and liquid splash exposures.  

Sunglasses with an ANSI Z87.1 rating are tested against the following eye hazards:

    • Blunt impact
    • Radiation
    • Liquid splashes and drops
    • Dust and small dust particles
    • Wind

 

To earn compliance, sunglasses are put to the test. 

Some of our favorite ANSI eyewear tests include. . .

ANSI Testing on Sunglasses: High-Impact Blows to Lenses and Frame

Yeah, ANSI’s pretty hardcore, and we have mad respect for sunglasses that pass these brutal tests. 

There are a couple of impact ratings: “Z87” alone means the sunglasses passed the basic impact tests, and “Z87+” means the sunglasses passed the high-velocity impact tests.

Below are images that show one of the high-impact tests. The top pictures are of ANSI Z87.1 compliant sunglasses, and the bottom pictures are of sunglasses that obviously failed the test. Ouch.

One of many of the ANSI high-impact tests. These sunglasses passed the test.

 

ANSI Test Fail
ANSI impact test FAIL. Images from Edge Eyewear: An Inside Look at Testing for High Impact Compliance

You have the right to ask for proof of ANSI standards compliance from any eyewear manufacturer. Do not trust eyewear that does not have the standard printed on it. If you’re really into this stuff, then check out ANSI.org for more details. 

CLICK HERE for more Sunglasses 101 from NativeSlope.com

Check out THIS POST to learn about what makes polarized sunglasses polarized.

Check out THIS POST to figure out which lens color is best for you.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Sunglasses 101: The Best Sunglasses for Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing is an easy way to enjoy all that a backcountry winter wonderland has to offer. It can also be hard on your eyes, as snow reflects high levels of harmful UV rays that can distort your vision and irritate your retinas.  Too much UV exposure may also permanently harm your eyes.

Your eyes are awesome. Don’t hurt them while you’re snowshoeing.  Choose the right sunglasses to get the most out of your backcountry experience.

Here are six things you should consider when you’re choosing a pair of sunglasses for snowshoeing.

 

1 :: Size Matters

Be sure to choose a pair of sunglasses that provide full coverage. Not only do you need to protect your eyes from UV damage, but you also need to protect them from elements like wind, snow, dust, and other debris.

2 :: Venting = Awesome

Choose a pair with anti-fog features like venting and/or a coating. Although coatings are helpful, venting is hands-down the best. Find sunglasses like Tifosi sunglasses, which come with vented lensesNative Eyewear also makes many vented and anti-fog options that are perfect for outdoor winter adventures

3 :: Polarized Isn’t Always the Best 

Many falsely assume that polarized lenses are better lenses, no matter the conditions. As it turns out, polarized lenses are better in certain circumstances; however, they can distort your vision in other circumstances, particularly snowy conditions.

When the conditions are super bright, and there is snow on the ground, the glare is intense; however, most of the rays reflected off of the snow are not polarized, so polarized sunglasses will not work.  In fact, they could make the glare worse. Non-polarized sunglasses and goggles are best when the sun is bright and there is a layer of snow on the ground.

Polarized sunglasses cut horizontal polarized light and glare.  This is ideal when you want to cut contrast on water to see below the surface.  This is not ideal when looking at snow, as polarized lenses will smooth contrast and make the surface of the snow more difficult to navigate.  It’s science.

CLICK HERE to read more about how polarized sunglasses work.

4 :: Choose The Right Lens Color

It’s all about the lens. The following lens colors are best in winter conditions.

Gray lenses reduce the sun’s intensity without distorting contrast or color. They are great for outdoor activities that require a broad view, especially on blue-sky days.

Amber/Yellow/Brown lenses are good in hazy and overcast conditions because they enhance contrast, which makes them perfect for winter sports and driving.  Native Eyewear makes a Sportflex lens, which is ideal in low-light conditions. 

Mirrored lenses are particularly good when skiing or snowboarding in high-glare conditions.  This does depend on the color of the lenses, as mirrored lenses look badass, so some models are made more for looks than performance.  

CLICK HERE to see our lens color guide.

5 :: Be Prepared to Switch it Up

If you can find a pair of sunglasses with interchangeable lenses, then you’re golden. Winter sun conditions can change quickly, so if you can quickly change your lenses as conditions change, then you’ll be a sunglasses superstar.

6 :: Yes, Wear Sunglasses Even When It’s Cloudy

Especially when the sky is overcast, wearing sunglasses in the winter is imperative because the winter sun sits lower in the sky and at a more harmful angle.  Add snow to the mix, and your eyes are at risk of major irritation and burn. Yes, that’s right, if you’re not careful, you can burn your eyeballs. Yikes.

Even though it may not seem as intense, the winter sun is often more harmful to your eyes than the summer sun. To add to the mayhem, the sun’s rays are like powerfully stealthy ninjas that can cut through haze, fog, and clouds. Don’t let overcast conditions fool you. Speaking of ninjas, snow reflects up to 85% of the sun’s harmful UV rays.  Alright, that has nothing to do with ninjas, but wearing sunglasses in the winter is kind of a big deal.

CLICK HERE to learn more about why you should always wear sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

Want to know more about which sunglasses are best in the winter? CLICK HERE to find out.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Hello, Hoven! 6 Things We Love About Hoven Sunglasses

Born in San Diego in 2002, Hoven Vision lives and breathes West Coast action sports, and they deliver sunglasses that appeal to professionals and amateurs alike. Hoven strives to reach people with a true passion for what they do and how they live.

Hoven visionaries know who they are and what they want: We are Hoven.  Passionate. Independent. Legitimate. Wherever you are, whatever you’re into, and whatever the weather, we’ve got the eyewear.

Photos: Hoven Vision & Niall Morga @shorebreakimagery



:: Here are 6 Things We Love About Hoven Sunglasses ::



1 :: These Shades are Innovative & Badass.  And, THEY FLOAT!

Hoven’s innovative Argonaut Series sunglasses feature a complete wraparound design with their patented CliC Magnetic Technology for a legitimately secure and comfortable fit on the water. Oh, and they float! Yes, that’s right; they float, as in you drop your favorite pair of shades into the water, and they will be waiting for you, bobbing on the surface. Check it out:

Video: Hovenvision.com


2 :: Hoven Keeps it Real

When we asked our Hoven sales and marketing rep for some promo photos, he sent us quite a few, and most of them were of real people having real fun in real situations. They aren’t kidding when they say that Hoven Vision isn’t just a sunglasses company; it’s a lifestyle.  

Photos: Hoven Vision

We’re also incredibly impressed with Hoven’s customer service and responsiveness. When we ask their team a question or place an order, they respond quickly, and time doesn’t seem to matter; our latest response came on a Sunday morning, which was completely unexpected and totally awesome.  


3 :: Hoven Provides Options. We Like Options

Hoven makes their sunglasses for professionals and amateurs alike.  With different options and price points, you can get a pair of shades that will keep up with whatever adventure you have planned, no matter the intensity, no matter the speed.  All Hoven sunglasses are constructed of quality materials, and most are polarized.

Ever wonder what makes polarized sunglasses polarized?  CLICK HERE to find out!


4 :: The Hoven Lifestyle is Worth Living

We’ll let more pictures speak for themselves:

Photos: Hoven Vision


 5 :: Hoven is Inclusive & Authentic

Hoven expresses their inclusive and authentic attitude best in their mission statement: Hoven has an agenda to connect broad audiences, from surf and skate to bikers and fishermen. Those who identify with an attitude rather than a sport and strive to represent a way of life in a way that reflects legitimacy and the ultimate authenticity.


6 :: Hoven Sunglasses Look & Feel Good

Photos: Hoven Vision @HovenVision

I’m obsessed with my Hoven Big Risky sunglasses, and so is everyone else. These shades grab serious attention. With my Big Risky sunglasses, the compliments come not only because the shades make a bold statement but also because they’re clearly made with consideration and skill. Whenever someone comments on my Big Riskys, I take them off and let the admirer hold them. They are handcrafted and made of quality materials, and you can immediately tell.  Any pair of sunglasses that make me look and feel good while also keeping up with  my active lifestyle is a keeper, and my Hoven sunglasses are my new favorites.

Photos: NativeSlope.com @NativeSlope

 

 


Cover & Ad Images: Hoven Vision
© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Halloween Costume Ideas That Feature Sunglasses

The best Halloween costumes come with sunglasses. Obviously. Here are some Halloween costume ideas  for men and women that feature sweet, sweet shades.

 | Melania Trump at Night |

Photo: Yahoo! Lifestyle

Dressing up as the first lady is one thing; dressing up as the first lady in sunglasses at night is quite another. Grab a group of gal pals and sport many of Melania’s “shady” nighttime looks.

| Halloween is the Best Time to be Bad |

Photo: AMC

Grab a friend, your pork pie hat, and some science to cook up a Halloween night o’ fun as Walter White and Jesse Pinkman.

| Ever Seen Lil Jon Without Shades? Yeeaaaah, no.  |

Photo: Vibe.com

This photo speaks for itself, and so will your costume.

| Grab Some Wayfarers and Get Risky |

Photo: Warner Bros.

All you need are some black wayfarer sunglasses, a black polo, some jeans from your dad’s closet, and a really good-looking blonde, and you’ve got yourself a costume.

| Hit the Road in Some Yellow-Tinted Beauties |

Photo: Universal Pictures

Bucket hat, check. Floral Acapulco shirt, yes. Yellow-tinted, oversized aviators, yup. Now all you need is your buddy Dr. Gonzo and a suitcase full of fun, and you’re ready for the ultimate “business” trip.

| Say Hello to Some Badass Sunglasses |

Photo: Universal Pictures

Ok, sure, the heading for this one is beyond cheesy, but your Tony Montana costume won’t be.

| Get Twiggy With It |

Photos: Marie Claire

Iconic sunglasses make for an iconic costume.

 | Wrangle Some Buddies and Take it Easy |

Photo: Columbia/Tristar

This trio isn’t just about  putting together the right the headgear, hair, and shades; you’ll also need to pick up and put on a particularly easy-going, spontaneous, roll-with-the-flow kind of attitude.

| Step Into the Danger Zone |

Photo: Paramount Pictures

Speaking of trios, here’s a classic.  Too cliche?  Never. If you must change things up, then be this crew after retirement. Or, maybe as zombies. Zombies are never cliche, especially when they’re wearing sunglasses.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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Sunglasses 101: Wear Sunglasses, Even When It’s Cloudy

The sun’s harmful rays are way more sneaky than you may think. Able to cut through fog, haze, and clouds, UV rays make overcast days deceiving, and you should always wear sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

Don’t worry, sunglass manufacturers know this, and they make lenses specifically for low-light conditions so that you can see clearly and protect your eyes, even in overcast conditions.

Here are a few things you should know about wearing sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

1 | UV Rays Are Like Ninjas

80% of the sun’s rays can get through clouds. This depends on the types of clouds and cover. According to the American Cancer Society, some types of clouds can actually increase UV intensity. Cloud science is interesting, but you probably don’t have the time or equipment to identify and assess the clouds each time you step outside. UV rays are sneaky devils that can get through clouds, making them easy to foolishly dismiss on overcast days. Don’t let the sun’s ninja rays fool you. Wear sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

2 | Wear Sunglasses, Even in the Shade

Surfaces reflect UV rays, especially water, snow, sand, and pavement. Even if you’re under an umbrella or wearing a hat, you should wear sunglasses. Those shifty rays can bounce off of a surface right into your eyes. Protect your eyes; wear sunglasses, even in the shade.  

CLICK HERE to learn more about why you should always wear sunglasses in the winter.

3 | Change Lens Color as Light Changes

Brands like Tifosi and Native Eyewear deliver sunglasses with multiple lenses that you can easily change as light conditions change.

Native Eyewear Nova Sunglasses - Iron Black Frame - Sportflex Lens
Native Eyewear makes a Sportflex colored lens designed specifically for low-light conditions | Native Eyewear Nova Sunglasses

CLICK HERE to learn more about which lens colors to wear in which light conditions.

4 | Consider Time of Day and Elevation

According to the American Cancer Society, UV rays are the most intense between 10am and 4pm, and more rays reach the ground at higher elevations.

5 | Don’t Forget About Your Eyelids

Your eyeballs are not the only things at risk when you’re outside; UV rays can also burn your eyelids. Yikes. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, eyelid cancers may account for 10% of all skin cancers. 

6 | All Sunglasses Are NOT Created Equal

Always read the label before purchasing a pair of shades. If they do not say that they provide at least 98% UV protection, – 100% is obviously the best – then don’t buy them.  Stay away from labels that say things like “UV absorbing” or “blocks most UV light”. Look for a specific rating. Speaking of ratings, sunglasses that provide 400nm protection also provide 100% UV protection.

Costa Del Mar Rockport Sunglasses - Tortoise POLARIZED Sunrise Yellow 580P
Always check the label or sticker to make sure the lenses provide 100% UV protection. | Costa Del Mar Rockport Sunglasses

7 | Size Matters

It’s true. Always consider size and fit. Some sunglasses may look awesome, but if the lenses do not completely cover your eyes, including the sides, or there is too much space between the frame and your face, then the sunglasses will not be awesome defenders against UV rays. Sport and wrap sunglasses typically provide the most protection.

8 | Polarized Does Not Mean UV Protection

Polarized lenses have a filter that reduces glare from sunlight that’s reflected off of a flat surface. Polarization alone does not provide UV protection.  Most quality polarized sunglasses like Native Eyewear, Costa Del Mar, and Kaenon also provide 100% UV protection, but you should always double-check a pair of sunglasses’ UV protection rating, and you should always wear sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

CLICK HERE to learn more about polarized sunglasses and how they work.  

 

© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Sunglasses 101: Lens Color Guide

Choosing the right lens color can be overwhelming, especially when you’re shopping performance sunglasses. Below is a basic guide to help you understand how different lens colors work in different light conditions.  

:: The Basics ::

Darker lens colors like gray, green, and brown work best in medium and bright light conditions.
Lighter lens colors like yellow and rose work best in lower light conditions.
Got it?  Good.  

:: Let’s Get More Specific ::

 

 Gray Lenses

Gray lenses are an excellent choice for everyday, general wear. They are the darkest lenses that provide the most light reduction in bright conditions. They can also function fairly well in lower-light and hazy or foggy conditions. They are ideal when on water, as polarized versions work particularly well to reduce reflection and glare.

Green Lenses

Ray-Ban Aviator Sunglasses -SMALL 52mm Matte Black - Green Lens - RB3044

Green lenses are also quite versatile and excellent for everyday wear. Green lenses are good in bright conditions, and they work particularly well in moderate-light or partly cloudy conditions, as they enhance contrast and color.

Copper Lenses

Costa Del Mar Straits Sunglasses - Blackout Black - POLARIZED Copper 580P

Copper lenses significantly increase contrast in medium and bright light conditions.  Sunglasses with copper lenses are a popular choice for anglers, boaters, and paddlers because they enhance contrast without distorting color.

Brown or Amber Lenses

Kaenon Pintail Sunglasses - Matte Tobacco - B12 Brown POLARIZED 029-02-B12

Lenses in the brown color family provide the best contrast in the widest variety of light conditions, and this is an excellent lens color for everyday wear and versatility.  Brown lenses will distort color more than gray or green lenses, but they offer better contrast in overcast or flat light conditions.

Yellow Lenses

Costa Del Mar Rockport Sunglasses - Tortoise POLARIZED Sunrise Yellow 580P

Yellow lenses are excellent in low-light, hazy, or foggy conditions. They are popular amongst pilots, drivers, and marksmen. Runners and cyclists also prefer yellow lenses in early morning or evening light conditions. Sunglasses with yellow lenses are also an ideal choice for those who desire eye protection from computer screens and other devices that emit harmful blue light.  They are not a good choice for bright light conditions, and they will distort colors.

Native Eyewear Nova Sunglasses - Iron Black Frame - Sportflex Lens

Native Eyewear offers a “sportflex” lens color that’s a great alternative to a yellow lens. The sportflex lens is made to reduce color distortion while enhancing contrast in low-light conditions.

Blue or Purple Lenses

Aside from being fashion-forward, blue and purple lenses are ideal for winter sports or other flat-light conditions that require depth perception and enhanced contrast. They work particularly well in foggy, hazy, and snowy conditions. If you have sunglasses that enable you to switch out lenses as conditions change, then a pair of gray lenses for bright conditions and a pair of blue or purple lenses for low-light conditions are ideal, especially on water and snow.

Pink, Red, or Rose Lenses

Pink, red, or rose lenses also offer excellent visibility in low-light and snowy conditions. Providing the greatest amount of contrast, they are ideal when driving or being active in the snow in low-light or flat-light conditions. They are an excellent choice as back-up lenses to replace green or gray lenses as light conditions change.   

© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Sunglasses 101: The Best Sunglasses for Winter

Unless it’s a blue-sky day, it’s easy to forget to wear sunglasses in the winter. That’s a horrible idea. Please swear to never, ever forget your shades in the winter again.  Seriously, swear it.  Your eyes will thank you.

::  Even When it’s Overcast?

 Wear sunglasses in the winter, even if it's overcast. Get some great winter sunglasses at NativeSlope.com

Especially when the sky is overcast. Wearing sunglasses in the winter is imperative because the winter sun sits lower in the sky and at a more harmful angle.  Yikes. Even though it may not seem as intense, the winter sun is often more harmful to your eyes than the summer sun. To add to the mayhem, the sun’s rays are like powerfully stealthy ninjas that can cut through haze, fog, and clouds. Don’t let overcast conditions fool you. Speaking of ninjas, snow reflects up to 85% of the sun’s harmful UV rays.  Alright, that has nothing to do with ninjas, but wearing sunglasses in the winter is kind of a big deal.

::  To Polarize or Not to Polarize?

Polarized sunglasses don't always help with snow glare. In can sometimes make it worse. Get some non-polarized sunglasses at NativeSlope.com

It all depends on the conditions, so having a pair of polarized sunglasses and a pair of non-polarized sunglasses is a good idea in the winter.

When the conditions are super bright, and there is snow on the ground, the glare is intense; however, most of the rays reflected off of the snow are not polarized, so polarized sunglasses will not work.  In fact, they could make the glare worse. Non-polarized sunglasses and goggles are best when the sun is bright, and there is a layer of snow on the ground.

When winter conditions are grey and foggy, polarized sunglasses are ideal because they cut through the haze, especially on the horizon.  That’s because polarized sunglasses cut horizontal polarized light and glare.  It’s science. CLICK HERE to read more about how polarized sunglasses work.

:: It’s Not Just About The Rays

Sunglasses protect your eyes from more than just harmful UV rays. Get some sunglasses now at NativeSlope.com

General winter conditions can also harm your eyes, and sunglasses can protect you from the following winter hazards:

  • Sunglasses protect the delicate skin around your eyes, which is particularly susceptible to sunburn.
  • Sunglasses protect your eyes from wind, debris, and snow.
  • In colder weather, your eyes are more likely to become dry and irritated. Sunglasses will protect your eyes from the elements that cause dryness.
  • Glare causes squinting, which can damage the skin around your eyes and contribute to eye fatigue. Sunglasses will keep your eyes healthier and happier.
  • Sunglasses always come with an element of cool, and who doesn’t want to look cool?

 

:: Which Sunglasses are Best in Winter?

mountain-reflection-1-1462040

It’s all about the lens. The following lens colors are best in winter conditions:

Grey lenses reduce the sun’s intensity without distorting contrast or color. They are great for outdoor activities that require a broad view, especially on blue-sky days.

Amber/Yellow/Brown lenses are good in hazy and overcast conditions because they enhance contrast, which makes them perfect for winter sports and driving.

Mirrored lenses are particularly good when skiing or snowboarding in high-glare conditions.  This does depend on the color of the lenses, as mirrored lenses simply look badass, so some models are made more for looks than performance.  

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© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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