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Stay Cool When It’s Hot :: What to Wear Hiking in the Desert

Yes, the desert is hot.  Really freakin’ hot.  It’s also an incredibly beautiful place to hike.  When preparing for a desert hike, always remember these three things:

1.  No cotton.  Ever.  Wear lightweight, breathable, quick-drying materials.

2.  Always remember head-to-toe sun protection. From sweat-proof sunscreen to UV-rated sunglasses, always think about UV protection.

3.  Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Make drinking water easy and accessible.

Here’s a basic outfit for hiking in the desert:

Desert Hiking Outfit

 

UV Protective Long-Sleeve Shirt: 

Button-fronts are good because they’re easy to get on and off, you can leave them open for ventilation, and the sleeves are easy to roll up.  

Full-Back Tank:

A light colored, quick-drying top is a must.  Sleeveless tops are nice because they provide the most airflow, but choose wisely as you consider where your pack will rest.  Something with a full back is the most comfortable, and avoid thin or spaghetti straps.  Cap and short-sleeved shirts are also great. Remember to avoid cotton. 

Low-Profile Sunglasses:

Always bring a great pair of lightweight and breathable sunglasses.  Avoid metal frames that will get hot, and stay away from large designs that can trap uncomfortable moisture and dust.  Native Eyewear, Oakley, and Under Armour make some great sunglasses for hiking. The outfit above features a pair of Native Eyewear Dash XP shades, which have a rimless bottom for plenty of ventilation. 

Sport Sunscreen:

Sunscreen is so important, even when it’s cloudy.  Choose a type that is made for athletes and isn’t greasy or heavy. It needs to be sweat-proof, but you don’t want something that will attract dirt or clog your pores.  

Hydration Pack:

Invest in a good, low-profile hydration pack that will make drinking plenty of water easy.  When it’s not easy, you’re more likely to forget or procrastinate.  That’s never a good thing. 

Breathable Hiking Shorts:

A lightweight, quick-drying pair of hiking shorts will keep you cool and comfortable.  Some hikers like biking or yoga shorts, which work, but those can be hot or cause chafing if they do not fit perfectly.

Lightweight, Breathable Hiking Shoes:

Breathable shoes with grippy rubber traction are a must.  Pair with lightweight, moisture-wicking hiking socks.  Don’t hike without socks.  Your feet will sweat and blister. Ouch.

 

Other Desert Hiking Things to Consider

Some other things to consider:

  • A sun hat that fits comfortably over your sunglasses
  • Lightweight, quick-drying hiking socks
  • Lip balm with sun protection
  • A bandana to wick moisture when it’s dry and keep you cool when it’s soaked in water
  • Breathable, moisture-wicking sports bra and underwear

 
 

© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Need a new pair of hiking sunglasses?  NativeSlope.com has got you covered.

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Sunglasses 101: What are Polarized Sunglasses?

You know that you want them, you know that they are awesome, and you know that they might cost more, but what, exactly, are polarized sunglasses?  Are they really worth the hype and extra cash?

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Costa Del Mar Tern Polarized Sunglasses :: NativeSlope.com

On a basic level, a polarized lens has a chemical film that reduces glare by filtering intense light that is reflected off of a flat surface.  Sure.  Ok.  So, what does that mean?

It all starts with the sun and light.  We need them; we love them; they’re great.  Light waves emitted by the sun vibrate in many different directions.  When light waves align on a single plane, they are polarized, and they are significantly intensified, producing distracting glare.  This happens when the light waves reflect off of a flat surface like a road, a windshield, or a body of water. The light waves align to match the surface angle of whatever they hit, so a horizontal surface like a lake will produce horizontally polarized light, causing intense glare that makes it impossible to see below the surface of the water.

Polarized lenses are coated with a harmless chemical film that contains molecules that align to filter out the horizontally polarized light so that you can see through the distracting glare.

So, are they really worth it?  Boaters and anglers certainly think so, as polarized lenses enable them to see below the surface of the water.  Some manufacturers like Costa Del Mar and Native Eyewear strive to develop and deliver some of the most innovative and effective polarized lenses on the market, appealing particularly to water sports enthusiasts.  Polarized lenses are also helpful when driving and cycling in conditions that will likely produce horizontally polarized light and glare.  In some cases, however, they are not necessary.  Consider the type of glare you may encounter to determine whether or not you need polarized sunglasses.

 

I’m not a scientist, and I’m pretty sure I would have failed physics, if I’d ever bothered to take it.  So, here are my sources:
“Polarization.” Light Waves and Color – Lesson 1 – How Do We Know Light Is a Wave? The Physics Classroom, 2016. Web. 16 Apr. 2016. 
Tyson, Jeff. “How Sunglasses Work.” Science: Everyday Inventions. HowStuffWorks, 14 July 2000. Web. 15 Apr. 2016.

 

© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


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Native Eyewear Sunglasses: Live the Adventure

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Native Eyewear realized what many have realized: Colorado is pretty much the best place on earth.  After 10 years in PA, Native moved to Denver in 2008, and they haven’t looked back. What they have done, however,  is look ahead. With their Locals Only Project and Natives Know Road Tour, Native Eyewear celebrates “the lives of those too amazing to be seen through an ordinary lens.”

Promoting a lifestyle just as much as they promote their sunglasses, Native Eyewear travels the country to find the people who share their vision of getting the most of out of life one outdoor adventure at a time.  Keep an eye out for the Native Eyewear Road Team and their sweet Native Road Rig. The sleek silver Mercedes Sprinter van bears the mountain landscape that the Road Team lives to explore.  You can keep up with their travels by following them on social media and the Native Eyewear website.

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Native Eyewear’s Natives Know Road Team, Roland Emerson Mott and Dani Rowland, travel the country collecting inspiring stories from those who know how to live and love the Native life.

Native Eyewear sunglasses are some of our best sellers and personal favorites.  We would love to become an authorized dealer; however, at this point, Native Eyewear reps tell us that we need a brick and mortar storefront.  As that is not a part of our story, we hope that Native will one day take their adventurous spirit to the World Wide Web. Our online store allows us to keep our prices low and our process simple.  So, here’s hoping.   Native, whenever you’re ready to take on an online dealer, we’d love to be a part of the adventure.

Check out some of our favorite Native Eyewear sunglasses:

Native Eyewear Dash SS
Native Eyewear Dash SS Polarized Sunglasses
Native Attack
Native Eyewear Attack Polarized Sunglasses
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Native Eyewear Highline Polarized Sunglasses

 

© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.