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See Native: You Can Always Take a Different Road

You’re probably familiar with Robert Frost’s poem The Road Not Taken, which ends with the famous lines:

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”

But, did you know it’s one of America’s most misread poems?

In the beginning, when describing the two roads, the poet says, “both that morning equally lay.”  One road wasn’t “less traveled” than the other; they looked the same.   

After choosing a road, the poet exclaims, “Oh, I kept the other for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back.” This reminds us that we often don’t consider taking more than one road. Or, worse, when we face two roads, we freeze and don’t take either.  Once we choose a road in life, we tend to think we have to stick to it forever, so we either freeze under pressure, or we choose one road, get used to it, and don’t take the time to go back and try another.  

In the end, the poet thinks about one day telling the story and probably saying, “I took the [road] less traveled by, and that has made all of the difference,” even though the roads really looked the same. 

The famous closing lines of The Road Not Taken are often misread and don’t mean that the more challenging roads in life are the better roads. They remind us that when we choose between two roads, one road isn’t always better than the other; they’re probably just different. When we reflect on our choices, we often change the truth in order to justify the consequences, when we don’t need to. If we’re not happy with a road we choose, then we can go back and choose another. We can take the roads not taken. 

Here’s the entire poem, if you’d like to check it out. 

If you don’t like the road you’re on,

you can always take another. 

#GoNativeSeeNative @ NativeSlope.com

We like and sell sunglasses. We also write about them. Check out more of our posts HERE.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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See Native: Brighten Your Day & Someone Else’s

Happiness is contagious, so spread some love today by focusing not only on others but also on yourself.

When you’re feeling good, others around you will too. We often spend too much time trying to make others happy, and we end up draining our own happiness.  That, in the end, doesn’t make anyone really happy at all.

Don’t confuse this with selfishness; if you’re reading this post, then you’re likely the kind of person who gets joy by giving joy.

Do what makes you joyful today.

Brighten someone else’s day by brightening your own.

#GoNativeSeeNative @ NativeSlope.com

We like and sell sunglasses. We also write about them. Check out more of our posts HERE.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Sunglasses 101: Grilamid TR® Sunglasses

Many performance sunglasses boast Grilamid TR® frames, which sounds like something from a superhero action movie, but what is Grilamid TR®? Is it as hardcore-awesome as it sounds?  Grilamid TR® is a badass material that is definitely hardcore-awesome, and that’s why it’s used in many military, medical, and other high-performance applications.

Grilamid TR® Defined for the Layman

Grilamid TR®  is a transparent amorphous thermoplastic, which means it’s a plastic material, or polymer, that gets soft when heated to extreme temperatures and solid when cooled, and it does this without discoloring or losing its strength. Manufacturers can easily shape it into objects that must maintain their integrity in physically-stressful, highly-active situations.

Not a layman or just want to geek out to more Grilamid TR® facts? CLICK HERE to check out EMS-GRIVORY’s  36-page Grilamid TR® info booklet. EMS-GRIVORY manufactures the stuff under the Grilamid TR® brand name, so they know what they’re talking about.

The Benefits of Grilamid®

Here’s why Grilamid TR® is particularly perfect for sunglasses:

  • It’s super lightweight
  • It’s flexible, impact-resistant, and extremely durable
  • It’s highly transparent and easy to color
  • It has low flammability and is resistant to many sunglass-harming chemicals
  • It stands up against high and low temperatures
  • It’s UV ray resistant

 
Not all sunglasses are created equal, and only some of the toughest, made-for-action shades have Grilamid TR® frames.  A few of our favorite brands that often feature Grilamid TR® frames include HovenUnder Armour, and Costa Del Mar.

Want to learn more about sunglasses, like what makes polarized sunglasses polarized and why an ANSI rating is important? Check out our other Sunglasses 101 posts!


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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Sunglasses 101: ANSI Rated Sunglasses

You’ve probably seen sunglasses that have an ANSI rating or a sticker that says they’re “ANSI compliant,” like these Under Armour sunglasses:

ANSI compliant sunglasses
Under Armour is one of many sunglass manufacturers that make ANSI compliant shades.

 

So, what does an ANSI rating mean, and why should you care about it when you’re selecting sunglasses?

For people who like to work hard and play hard, an ANSI rating is important, especially when hazardous materials and/or flying objects are involved.  When it comes to sunglassesANSI compliant means BADASS.

The acronym ANSI stands for the American National Standards Institute, which is a non-profit organization that serves as the United State’s official standards rating institution. ANSI has been around for over 90 years and has over 1000 members that work together to develop voluntary national consensus standards. These members include trade associations, government agencies, professional societies, labor interest groups, and more. ANSI strives to include “. . .representation from almost every U.S. industry sector.” 

When it comes to eyewear, the Z87.1 standard refers to the “American National Standard for Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices,” which includes minimum safety guidelines for non-prescription eye protection against different types of impact, radiation, and liquid splash exposures.  

Sunglasses with an ANSI Z87.1 rating are tested against the following eye hazards:

    • Blunt impact
    • Radiation
    • Liquid splashes and drops
    • Dust and small dust particles
    • Wind

 

To earn compliance, sunglasses are put to the test. 

Some of our favorite ANSI eyewear tests include. . .

ANSI Testing on Sunglasses: High-Impact Blows to Lenses and Frame

Yeah, ANSI’s pretty hardcore, and we have mad respect for sunglasses that pass these brutal tests. 

There are a couple of impact ratings: “Z87” alone means the sunglasses passed the basic impact tests, and “Z87+” means the sunglasses passed the high-velocity impact tests.

Below are images that show one of the high-impact tests. The top pictures are of ANSI Z87.1 compliant sunglasses, and the bottom pictures are of sunglasses that obviously failed the test. Ouch.

One of many of the ANSI high-impact tests. These sunglasses passed the test.

 

ANSI Test Fail
ANSI impact test FAIL. Images from Edge Eyewear: An Inside Look at Testing for High Impact Compliance

You have the right to ask for proof of ANSI standards compliance from any eyewear manufacturer. Do not trust eyewear that does not have the standard printed on it. If you’re really into this stuff, then check out ANSI.org for more details. 

CLICK HERE for more Sunglasses 101 from NativeSlope.com

Check out THIS POST to learn about what makes polarized sunglasses polarized.

Check out THIS POST to figure out which lens color is best for you.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Sunglasses 101: The Best Sunglasses for Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing is an easy way to enjoy all that a backcountry winter wonderland has to offer. It can also be hard on your eyes, as snow reflects high levels of harmful UV rays that can distort your vision and irritate your retinas.  Too much UV exposure may also permanently harm your eyes.

Your eyes are awesome. Don’t hurt them while you’re snowshoeing.  Choose the right sunglasses to get the most out of your backcountry experience.

Here are six things you should consider when you’re choosing a pair of sunglasses for snowshoeing.

 

1 :: Size Matters

Be sure to choose a pair of sunglasses that provide full coverage. Not only do you need to protect your eyes from UV damage, but you also need to protect them from elements like wind, snow, dust, and other debris.

2 :: Venting = Awesome

Choose a pair with anti-fog features like venting and/or a coating. Although coatings are helpful, venting is hands-down the best. Find sunglasses like Tifosi sunglasses, which come with vented lensesNative Eyewear also makes many vented and anti-fog options that are perfect for outdoor winter adventures

3 :: Polarized Isn’t Always the Best 

Many falsely assume that polarized lenses are better lenses, no matter the conditions. As it turns out, polarized lenses are better in certain circumstances; however, they can distort your vision in other circumstances, particularly snowy conditions.

When the conditions are super bright, and there is snow on the ground, the glare is intense; however, most of the rays reflected off of the snow are not polarized, so polarized sunglasses will not work.  In fact, they could make the glare worse. Non-polarized sunglasses and goggles are best when the sun is bright and there is a layer of snow on the ground.

Polarized sunglasses cut horizontal polarized light and glare.  This is ideal when you want to cut contrast on water to see below the surface.  This is not ideal when looking at snow, as polarized lenses will smooth contrast and make the surface of the snow more difficult to navigate.  It’s science.

CLICK HERE to read more about how polarized sunglasses work.

4 :: Choose The Right Lens Color

It’s all about the lens. The following lens colors are best in winter conditions.

Gray lenses reduce the sun’s intensity without distorting contrast or color. They are great for outdoor activities that require a broad view, especially on blue-sky days.

Amber/Yellow/Brown lenses are good in hazy and overcast conditions because they enhance contrast, which makes them perfect for winter sports and driving.  Native Eyewear makes a Sportflex lens, which is ideal in low-light conditions. 

Mirrored lenses are particularly good when skiing or snowboarding in high-glare conditions.  This does depend on the color of the lenses, as mirrored lenses look badass, so some models are made more for looks than performance.  

CLICK HERE to see our lens color guide.

5 :: Be Prepared to Switch it Up

If you can find a pair of sunglasses with interchangeable lenses, then you’re golden. Winter sun conditions can change quickly, so if you can quickly change your lenses as conditions change, then you’ll be a sunglasses superstar.

6 :: Yes, Wear Sunglasses Even When It’s Cloudy

Especially when the sky is overcast, wearing sunglasses in the winter is imperative because the winter sun sits lower in the sky and at a more harmful angle.  Add snow to the mix, and your eyes are at risk of major irritation and burn. Yes, that’s right, if you’re not careful, you can burn your eyeballs. Yikes.

Even though it may not seem as intense, the winter sun is often more harmful to your eyes than the summer sun. To add to the mayhem, the sun’s rays are like powerfully stealthy ninjas that can cut through haze, fog, and clouds. Don’t let overcast conditions fool you. Speaking of ninjas, snow reflects up to 85% of the sun’s harmful UV rays.  Alright, that has nothing to do with ninjas, but wearing sunglasses in the winter is kind of a big deal.

CLICK HERE to learn more about why you should always wear sunglasses, even when it’s cloudy.

Want to know more about which sunglasses are best in the winter? CLICK HERE to find out.


© Native Slope and NativeSlope.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without expressed and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Native Slope and NativeSlope.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.